hearandknow

The psychology of music

In music theory, psychology on November 8, 2012 at 19:30

Psychology of Music detail

“There’s more to why we like music than just a catchy beat or an easy karaoke tune. Dozens of receptors in or brain respond to differen musical aspects like tone, rhythm and lyrics, determining the qualitites we personally like and dislike. Don’t let music just go in one ear and out the other – learn how to interpret your brain’s response to music, the benifts of listening to it and the importance of music education.”

The following infographic is made by the department for music education of the university of florida.

Infographic about music psychology

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  1. Reblogged this on The Blues Poodle and commented:
    Add your thoughts here… (optional)

  2. This is interesting stuff and focuses on the main difference between music and other arts. I have always believed that music mimics the very nature of things, conditions that existed before consciousness even arrived. This is partly because music is a temporal form, allowing for development through time.

  3. Music and Emotions

    The most difficult problem in answering the question of how music creates emotions is likely to be the fact that assignments of musical elements and emotions can never be defined clearly. The solution of this problem is the Theory of Musical Equilibration. It says that music can’t convey any emotion at all, but merely volitional processes, the music listener identifies with. Then in the process of identifying the volitional processes are colored with emotions. The same happens when we watch an exciting film and identify with the volitional processes of our favorite figures. Here, too, just the process of identification generates emotions.

    An example: If you perceive a major chord, you normally identify with the will “Yes, I want to…”. The experience of listening to a minor chord can be compared to the message conveyed when someone says, “No more.” If someone were to say these words slowly and quietly, they would create the impression of being sad, whereas if they were to scream it quickly and loudly, they would be come across as furious. This distinction also applies for the emotional character of a minor chord: if a minor harmony is repeated faster and at greater volume, its sad nature appears to have suddenly turned into fury.

    Because this detour of emotions via volitional processes was not detected, also all music psychological and neurological experiments, to answer the question of the origin of the emotions in the music, failed.

    But how music can convey volitional processes? These volitional processes have something to do with the phenomena which early music theorists called “lead”, “leading tone” or “striving effects”. If we reverse this musical phenomena in imagination into its opposite (not the sound wants to change – but the listener identifies with a will not to change the sound) we have found the contents of will, the music listener identifies with. In practice, everything becomes a bit more complicated, so that even more sophisticated volitional processes can be represented musically.

    Further information is available via the free download of the e-book “Music and Emotion – Research on the Theory of Musical Equilibration:

    http://www.willimekmusic.de/music-and-emotions.pdf

    or on the online journal EUNOMIOS:

    http://www.eunomios.org

    Enjoy reading

    Bernd Willimek, music theorist

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